Net Zero by 2050 A Roadmap for the Global Energy Sector

The energy sector is the source of around three‐quarters of greenhouse gas emissions  today and holds the key to averting the worst effects of climate change, perhaps the  greatest challenge humankind has faced. Reducing global carbon dioxide (CO2) emissions to  net zero by 2050 is consistent with efforts to limit the long‐term increase in average global  temperatures to 1.5 °C. This calls for nothing less than a complete transformation of how we  produce, transport and consume energy. The growing political consensus on reaching net  zero is cause for considerable optimism about the progress the world can make, but the  changes required to reach net‐zero emissions globally by 2050 are poorly understood. A huge  amount of work is needed to turn today’s impressive ambitions into reality, especially given  the range of different situations among countries and their differing capacities to make the  necessary changes. This special IEA report sets out a pathway for achieving this goal, resulting  in a clean and resilient energy system that would bring major benefits for human prosperity  and well‐being.  The global pathway to net‐zero emissions by 2050 detailed in this report requires all  governments to significantly strengthen and then successfully implement their energy and  climate policies. Commitments made to date fall far short of what is required by that  pathway. The number of countries that have pledged to achieve net‐zero emissions has  grown rapidly over the last year and now covers around 70% of global emissions of CO2. This  is a huge step forward. However, most pledges are not yet underpinned by near‐term policies  and measures. Moreover, even if successfully fulfilled, the pledges to date would still leave  around 22 billion tonnes of CO2 emissions worldwide in 2050. The continuation of that trend  would be consistent with a temperature rise in 2100 of around 2.1 °C. Global emissions fell  in 2020 because of the Covid‐19 crisis but are already rebounding strongly as economies  recover. Further delay in acting to reverse that trend will put net zero by 2050 out of reach.  In this Summary for Policy Makers, we outline the essential conditions for the global energy  sector to reach net‐zero CO2 emissions by 2050. The pathway described in depth in this  report achieves this objective with no offsets from outside the energy sector, and with low  reliance on negative emissions technologies. It is designed to maximise technical feasibility,  cost‐effectiveness and social acceptance while ensuring continued economic growth and  secure energy supplies. We highlight the priority actions that are needed today to ensure the  opportunity of net zero by 2050 – narrow but still achievable – is not lost. The report provides  a global view, but countries do not start in the same place or finish at the same time:  advanced economies have to reach net zero before emerging markets and developing  economies, and assist others in getting there. We also recognise that the route mapped out  here is a path, not necessarily the path, and so we examine some key uncertainties, notably  concerning the roles played by bioenergy, carbon capture and behavioural changes. Getting  to net zero will involve countless decisions by people across the world, but our primary aim  is to inform the decisions made by policy makers, who have the greatest scope to move the  world closer to its climate goals.   IEA. All rights reserved. 14 International Energy Agency | Special Report Net zero by 2050 hinges on an unprecedented clean technology push to 2030  The path to net‐zero emissions is narrow: staying on it requires immediate and massive  deployment  of  all  available clean  and  efficient  energy technologies.  In  the  net‐zero  emissions pathway presented in this report, the world economy in 2030 is some 40% larger  than today but uses 7% less energy. A major worldwide push to increase energy efficiency is  an  essential  part  of  these  efforts,  resulting  in  the  annual  rate  of  energy  intensity  improvements averaging 4% to 2030 – about three‐times the average rate achieved over the  last two decades. Emissions reductions from the energy sector are not limited to CO2: in our  pathway, methane emissions from fossil fuel supply fall by 75% over the next ten years as a  result  of  a  global,  concerted  effort  to  deploy  all  available  abatement  measures  and  technologies.  Ever‐cheaper renewable energy technologies give electricity the edge in the race to zero.  Our pathway calls for scaling up solar and wind rapidly this decade, reaching annual additions  of 630 gigawatts (GW) of solar photovoltaics (PV) and 390 GW of wind by 2030, four‐times  the record levels set in 2020. For solar PV, this is equivalent to installing the world’s current  largest solar park roughly every day. Hydropower and nuclear, the two largest sources of  low‐carbon  electricity  today,  provide  an  essential  foundation  for  transitions.  As  the  electricity sector becomes cleaner, electrification emerges as a crucial economy‐wide tool  for reducing emissions. Electric vehicles (EVs) go from around 5% of global car sales to more  than 60% by 2030. Make the 2020s the decade of massive clean energy expansion All the technologies needed to achieve the necessary deep cuts in global emissions by  2030 already exist, and the policies that can drive their deployment are already proven.  As the world continues to grapple with the impacts of the Covid‐19 pandemic, it is  essential that the resulting wave of investment and spending to support economic  recovery is aligned with the net zero pathway. Policies should be strengthened to speed  the deployment of clean and efficient energy technologies. Mandates and standards are  vital  to  drive  consumer  spending  and  industry  investment  into  the  most  efficient  technologies. Targets and competitive auctions can enable wind and solar to accelerate  the electricity sector transition. Fossil fuel subsidy phase‐outs, carbon pricing and other  market reforms can ensure appropriate price signals. Policies should limit or provide  disincentives for the use of certain fuels and technologies, such as unabated coal‐fired  power  stations,  gas  boilers  and  conventional  internal  combustion  engine  vehicles.  Governments must lead the planning and incentivising of the massive infrastructure  investment, including in smart transmission and distribution grids.  

Document Tabs