Latest Research on Climate Change

1) Matthews, T. 2013. 'Institutional Perspectives on Operationalising Climate Adaptation through Planning,' in Planning Theory & Practice, 14(2), available at http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/14649357.2013.781208#.UbFB05y2-yM.

This paper looks at the operationalisation of climate change adaptation as a planning issue in the region of South East Queensland. it explores climate adaptation as an institutional challenge and highlights institutional change as a crucial factor in successful climate change adaptation planning and practice.

2) Burton, P., Lyons, K., Richards, C., Amati, M., Rose, N., Desfours, L., Pires, V. & R. Barclay 2013. Urban food security, urban resilience and climate change. Final report to the National Climate Change Adaptation Research Facility. Griffith University, The University of Queensland

and Macquarie University. Gold Coast, Australia. Available at http://www.nccarf.edu.au/publications/urban-food-security-resilience-climate-change.
 
This report is based on a two-city comparison in Australia regarding food consumption and production patterns and urban agriculture, and the possible impacts of climate change on food security. It provides an up-to-date review of these issues regarding opportunities and barriers for urban resilience and food security.

 

3) Burton, P. & Mustelin, J. 2013. Planning for Climate Change: Is Greater Public Participation the Key to Success? Urban Policy and Research, 1-17. Available at http://www.tandfonline.com/doi/full/10.1080/08111146.2013.778196#.UbFCP5y2-yM.
 

This paper looks at the assumption that greater public participation results in more robust and successful climate adaptation policies. It uses Australian climate policies in different levels to examine the extent and assumed benefits relating to public participation with a particular focus on South East Queensland region. The paper finds that the commitment to public participation varies between institutions but is most often present in the implementation of policies rather than in the development of adaptation policy.